Below is a list of katas we use.

Gekisai dai-ichi

First “attack and smash” kata.

It was created by Chojun Miyagi, the founder of Goju-ryu karate. The kata is named "Gekisai" which means "to shatter" or "to break through," and "dai-ichi" which means "number one." The kata is characterized by powerful, explosive techniques and strong stances. It is often taught to beginners as it is a relatively simple kata that helps to develop basic techniques and proper form.

Gekisai dai-ichi

Gekisai dai-ni

Second “attack and smash” kata. Both of the Gekisai kata were created by Chojun Miyagi as a gentler introduction to kata.

It was also created by Chojun Miyagi, the founder of Goju-ryu karate. Like Gekisai dai-ichi, the kata is named "Gekisai" which means "to shatter" or "to break through," and "dai-ni" which means "number two." Gekisai dai-ni is a more advanced version of Gekisai dai-ichi and is characterized by more complex techniques and fluid movements. It is typically taught to intermediate students who have already mastered Gekisai dai-ichi and are ready to move on to more advanced training.

Gekisai dai-ni

Saifa

Tear and destroy. Traditional kata of chinese origin brought to Okinawa by Kanryo Higaonna. This kata is thought to have been derived from white crane boxing style in China.

The name "Saifa" is derived from the Chinese characters for "smash and tear," which reflects the powerful, explosive techniques featured in the kata. Saifa is a relatively advanced kata that is typically taught to intermediate or advanced students who have already mastered the basics of Goju-ryu karate. It is known for its challenging techniques and fast, fluid movements.

Saifa

Seiyunchin

To control and pull in battle. Derivative of a very old chinese kata probably originally from the Hsing-I system.

The name "Seiyunchin" is derived from the Chinese characters for "calm mind, persevere and advance," which reflects the focus and control required to execute the techniques in the kata. Seiyunchin is known for its long, fluid movements and relaxed, natural stances. It is typically taught to intermediate or advanced students who have already mastered the basics of Goju-ryu karate.

Seiyunchin

Shisochin

Four directional battle. Taught to Kanryo Higaonna by Ryuryu Ko. One of Chojun Miyagi’s favourite kata in his later years.

The name "Shisochin" is derived from the Chinese characters for "four directions" and "battle," which reflects the kata's focus on techniques for defending against attacks from all directions. Shisochin is known for its powerful, explosive techniques and strong, stable stances. It is typically taught to intermediate or advanced students who have already mastered the basics of Goju-ryu karate.

Shisochin

Sanseru

Thirty six hands. Thirty six representing 6×6, the first six being eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and spirit and the second six, colour, voice, smell, taste, touch and justice.

The name "Sanseru" is derived from the Chinese characters for "36," which refers to the 36 techniques that are featured in the kata. Sanseru is known for its long, fluid movements and complex techniques, and is considered to be a challenging kata to master. It is typically taught to advanced students who have already mastered the basics of Goju-ryu karate and have a strong foundation in the martial art.

Sanseru

Sepai

Eighteen hands. Based upon crane techniques. Eighteen being 6×3 (colour, voice, smell, taste, touch and justice as in sanseru) and 3 representing good, bad and peace.

The name "Sepai" is derived from the Chinese characters for "18," which refers to the 18 techniques that are featured in the kata. Sepai is known for its powerful, explosive techniques and strong, stable stances. It is typically taught to intermediate or advanced students who have already mastered the basics of Goju-ryu karate and are ready to move on to more advanced training.

Sepai

Kururunfa

To destroy with ancient mantis techniques. Taught to Kanryo Higaonna by Ryoryu Ko from China. Its origins are unknown.

"Kururunfa" is derived from the Chinese characters for "easy," "lazy," and "separate." The kata is characterized by relaxed, natural movements and techniques that are executed in a smooth, flowing manner. It is typically taught to intermediate or advanced students who have already mastered the basics of Goju-ryu karate and have a strong foundation in the martial art.

Kururunfa

Seisan

Thirteen hands. The basic form of this kata contains 8 defensive and 5 attacking techniques. Thirteen is also a number representing good luck and prosperity in chinese numerology. Sesan is thought to be one of the oldest kata.

The name "Sesan" is derived from the Chinese characters for "13," which refers to the 13 techniques that are featured in the kata. Sesan is known for its powerful, explosive techniques and strong, stable stances. It is typically taught to intermediate or advanced students who have already mastered the basics of Goju-ryu karate and are ready to move on to more advanced training.

Seisan

Suparunpei

108 hands. 6x6x3, combining the elements represented in the meanings of sanseru and sepai. 108 also has special significance in buddhist beliefs from where the kata originated.

Suparinpei

Sanchin

Three battles. The fundamental kata of Goju Ryu. The form generally practised is a variation of Kanryo Higaonna’s kata that Chojun Miyagi chose to balance movements.

Sanchin is a kata that is practiced in some styles of karate, including Goju-ryu. It is known for its slow, tense movements and deep, controlled breathing, which are intended to build strength and power through the development of proper body alignment and muscle tension. Sanchin is often one of the first kata taught to beginners in Goju-ryu, as it forms the foundation for the style's other kata and techniques. The kata is believed to have originated in China and was introduced to Okinawa, where it was adapted and incorporated into the Goju-ryu system. Sanchin is also known for its use of "isshin," or "one-point," concentration, which involves focusing all of one's attention and energy on a single point in the body.

Sanchin

Tensho

Turning or flowing hands. Created by Chojun Miyagi, and is derived from a softer chinese form of sanchin.

It is known for its fluid, circular movements and is often referred to as the "Kata of Heaven." The kata is believed to have been created by Chojun Miyagi, the founder of Goju-ryu, who was said to have been inspired by Chinese martial arts when developing the kata. Tensho is typically taught to intermediate and advanced students in Goju-ryu, as it builds on the principles and techniques learned in the earlier kata. The kata is characterized by its use of open-hand techniques and flowing movements, which are intended to teach the practitioner how to yield and redirect an opponent's force.

Tensho